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Copyright Resources: For Faculty

In the Classroom

The primary thing that faculty need to understand is that when sharing content in the classroom, copyright compliance falls on the shoulders of the instructor.  This guide will help you make good decisions and will help you find the path of least resistance when using materials in the classroom.  

Always feel free to consult with the librarian subject liaison for your department for assistance.  The bookstore will also be able to answer questions about copyright clearance for course packs.

Format Face to Face Online
Article

If the Library has an electronic version of the article, use a persistent link to the article (eg. in Canvas and/or your syllabus).

If the article is available legally on the web, link to the article.

If not, you will need to conduct a fair use analysis before scanning or copying the article for your class.

If the Library has an electronic version of the article, use a persistent link  to the article (eg. in Canvas and/or your syllabus).

If the article is available legally on the web, link to the article.

If not, you will need to conduct a fair use analysis before scanning or copying the article for your class.

Chapter of Book

Place print copy of a book on reserve at the library.

If the Library has the ebook, put a persistent link to the ebook in your readings list.

If not, you will need to conduct a fair use analysis before scanning or copying the chapter for your class.

If the Library has the ebook, put a persistent link  to the ebook in your Canvas shell.

If not, you will need to conduct a fair use analysis before scanning or copying the chapter for your class.

You Tube Linking to a YouTube video is permitted.  If embedding code is provided, it is fine to embed. Be sure to attribute the creator. Avoid any video that you suspect is not a legal copy, not least because it could be taken down by YouTube at any time. Linking to a YouTube video is permitted.  If embedding code is provided, it is fine to embed. Be sure to attribute the creator. Avoid any video that you suspect is not a legal copy, not least because it could be taken down by YouTube at any time.
DVD

The Classroom exception permits you to show DVDs without limitation, provided that the DVD is legally made and acquired.

 

Pro Tip: Contact the Media Center at Ocean Campus for advice related to media.

Streaming a DVD in an online class will need to be permitted by the TEACH Act or be a fair use.  The TEACH Act specifically forbids copying an entire DVD. 

Fair use could conceivably permit it but a very rigorous analysis and justification would need to be provided.Portions necessary to serve your pedagogical purpose may be streamed to students. You will need to think through your purposes for including the content from the DVD and limit your use to only the necessary portions. 

The TEACH Act specifically allows:

"The performance of a nondramatic literary or musical work or reasonable and limited portions of any other work”; the DVD must be a legal copy and the content cannot be mediated educational programming.

as long as

“The performance or display is made by, at the direction of, or under the actual supervision of an instructor as an integral part of a class session offered as a regular part of the systematic mediated instructional activities.“

Library-licensed Streaming Content

Yes!  CCSF has licensed content you can embed in your classes. 

Use the library OneSearch to find media or ask for assistance at the the Media Center at Ocean Campus.  

Your subject librarian can also help you find streaming content.

See also: Faculty Guide to Streaming Media

Yes!  CCSF has licensed content you can embed in your classes. 

Use the library OneSearch to find media or ask for assistance at the the Media Center at Ocean Campus.  

Your subject librarian can also help you find streaming content.

See also: Faculty Guide to Streaming Media

Streaming from Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, etc. No.  Generally subscription streaming services' Terms of Use specify personal use only. Students must use their own personal subscriptions to these services. 
Images

Showing legally acquired images in the classroom is permitted.  If you post a slide deck to Canvas, consider removing any copyrighted material unless you have done a fair use analysis and determined that it is likely to be fair.

Consider using the Library's licensed content or Creative Commons licensed content from the web.  

Creative Commons licensed, public domain, or library-licensed material can be used.  

Otherwise, you will need to conduct a fair use analysis.

Figures, Charts, Graphs Permissible to use, with attribution.   Permissible to use, with attribution.  If the chart or graph is creative in it's display of information (as opposed to something that anyone could reproduce exactly given the same data), conduct a fair use analysis.
Music from a CD Okay to use. See DVD above.
Live Music Performance Yes, permitted by the classroom exemption. N/A
Sending Content Via Email It is better to send a link than to send an attachment.  Much of the details listed above for posting things online will be similar with email but posting on Canvas will make any fair use argument stronger. It is better to send a link than to send an attachment.  Much of the details listed above for posting things online will be similar with email but posting on Canvas will make any fair use argument stronger.
Student Work Get permission from the student in writing and keep that documentation.  Both copyright and FERPA apply. Get permission from the student in writing and keep that documentation.  Both copyright and FERPA apply.

Some instructors like create course packs made up of articles and original material in lieu of or as a complement to the textbook.  Course packs can be an excellent way to provide customized learning materials and can save students money.  It is important to understand when using copyrighted material in a course pack that you are responsible for ensuring that materials are being used legally and that clearance fees have been paid.  The CCSF Bookstore can help you understand whether or not you need to pay for copyright when sharing articles.

Remember, determining this is your responsibility, but the College has resources to help.  See the permissions section of this guide for more detailed information. The cost of copyright fees ranges widely from a few dollars to many hundred dollars per article. It is crucial to know what the fees are for each article before making copies.  Fees should be incorporated into the price of the pack.  Be sure to ask for support with this if you need it.

IMPORTANT: It may seem like commercial printers such as Copy Edge can provide materials less expensively than the CCSF Bookstore.  This is because they don't usually provide copyright clearance services.  They expect instructors to do due diligence on this because they understand that the responsibility falls on the person who is sharing the materials.  Be sure to ask about this when working with a commercial provider. Always keep documentation about clearance when sharing copyrighted materials.

One way to create free customized course packs is to provide access to articles from databases owned by the College. By using resources that are owned or subscribed to by the College you do NOT have to pay copyright clearance fees.  To do this, you need to provide a link to the article(s) from behind a firewall.  In other words, the materials can not be generally accessible from a public space such as a bookstore. Whether you teach in person or online, a Canvas course shell provides an excellent place to share articles and communicate with students.  Librarians are happy to help you with this -- set up an appointment with your department liaison or a center librarian.  

Another way to provide non-textbook content to students is to work with the library subject specialist for your area and use the subject guide for your discipline as a the primary learning materials.  Librarians may also be able to create customized subject guides for specific courses.

Resources:

When in doubt, ask at the library!

 

 

 

Keep up to date

Check out the CopyTalk webinars hosted by the American Library Association.  They cover a wide range of copyright issues.

Copyright statement for this guide

Creative Commons LicenseThis work by CCSF Library is licensed by City College of San Francisco under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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